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Palabre · Social Identities, Power, and Language

Selim-a Atallah Chettaoui (Xeno-) · Yasmine wardi Akrimi

Discussion Panel

23.09.23 | 18h
FR
18+

Duration: 2h

Place: Beursschouwburg

Social Identities, Power, and Language: a comparative perspective. Discussion about power dynamics – marginalisation and privilege.

This discussion sheds light on the complex interaction between social identities and power dynamics. According to the context, individuals can find themselves occupying positions of power whilst still being marginalised or dominated. We examine the role of language in the elaboration of discriminatory practices and policies in the Maghreb, particularly in Tunisia. We will then expand the discussion to the European context to compare such practices.

 

Curated by Ichraf Nasri for Xeno-
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Selim-a Atallah Chettaoui
Poet, performer, researcher, and member of Xeno-, Selim-a Atallah Chettaoui grew up in Tunisia. No stranger to intersectionality, their work explores intermediality and interlanguages as part of the [Cargo] collective and on their thesis on Literary Research and Creation at the University of Cergy. After several magazine publications (Point de Chute, Contre5ens, Manhattan Magazine, etc.) and the creation of a digital autofiction (https://binnelbinin.art/), their first poetry collection, Des odeurs de bretzels de barbecue et de weed (The scent of pretzels, barbecue, and weed) has been published at 10 pages au carré editions in November 2022. A performance artist, they perform at both art and literature venues (Le Générateur, beursschouwburg, Centre Wallonie-Bruxelles…) as well as at open-mic and electro nights. Their first academic article will appear in the proceedings of the poete.s.s.e.s conference, published by Rennes University Press.
Yasmine Wardi Akrimi
Yasmine Wardi Akrimi, is a doctoral student at the Faculty of Political and Social Sciences at Ghent University, and a policy analyst at the Brussels International Centre. The focus of their doctoral research is racial and gender minorities, namely black Tunisian women. It aims to explore how their subalternate status makes it possible to analyse belonging, otherness, whiteness, and modernity in post-colonial Tunisia, as well as more generally in the Maghreb. She is also working on the phenomenon of the discrimination of sub-Saharan African migrants in Tunisia.
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